Two parties. Zero results.

It's time to fix the equation.

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70%

of Americans are dissatisfied with the direction of our country (Gallup)

57%

believe we need an alternative to both major political parties (Gallup)

OUR BROKEN POLITICS.

America is on a dangerous trajectory. Both major political parties are moving farther to the ideological extremes, leaving little incentive for leaders to find common ground. The result is that large challenges facing our country are left unsolved and compounding with time.

But most Americans are not on the political extremes. We want our leaders to put our country ahead of their party. We want a political system that serves the people, not the politicians or their special interests. And after the most divisive and dysfunctional election of our lifetime, we’re joining together to reclaim our politics for the sane, pragmatic majority.

 

 

OUR HACK TO THE SYSTEM.

The Centrist Project aims to strategically elect independent candidates to office who can break through political gridlock and serve as a voice for all those in the sensible center –– not as a traditional third party, but as America’s first Unparty.

Our “Fulcrum Strategy” is focused on electing a sufficient number of these candidates to closely divided legislatures like the US Senate where, as a swing coalition, they can deny both parties an outright majority and use their disproportionate influence to forge real solutions.

It’s a tangible, achievable plan that can have a major political impact –– and it begins with you.

The Centrist Principles

Latest News

Media Coverage: "A group of centrists rise up"

At the end of March, we gathered Centrist Project staff, board members, supporters, former candidates, and partner organizations to chart the future of our movement. Jon Ward, Yahoo News' Senior Political Correspondent, had exclusive access to our Centrist Summit and offered a sneak peak of our plans for the 2018 election. 

#HackTheSenate reaches goal of 10,000 pledges

With a government as dysfunctional and polarized as ours, the question is often asked: “Why are there not more independent lawmakers in office?” Pundits will often offer the answer that it is because A) most Americans have a partisan slant and that B) independent candidates would not have the support or resources to win. But it is starting to look like those responses are no longer true: