Fred B.

Fred B.

Centrist Project Founding Member
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TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF.

I was born in New York City, raised in Miami, Florida. Entered the Air Force in 1960 retired in 1988 as a Master Sergeant. I worked in county government for seven and half years (Denver County) and worked in the Electric Utility industry for 27 years as an Information Technology professional.
I received my Bachelor’s degree in Management Science in 1982.
I’ve lived in New York, Florida, Germany, Colorado, Nevada, and California. I currently live in Tampa, Florida.
I’m a fiscal conservative, (small government, low taxes) tend to support social issues that don’t impact the budget negatively otherwise I’m a social conservative. I also believe that laws should apply to everyone without exception; that includes our law makers in congress.

WHAT DOES BEING A "CENTRIST" MEAN TO YOU, AND WHY DID YOU GET INVOLVED?

A centrist, to me, is someone who believes that the will of the American people is what should dictate our laws and how they are applied. I did not say the majority of Americans however; given that so many Americans live in densely populated urban areas. I believe our founders were insightful enough to provide a more fair way of electing our president.
A centrist should be able to listen, negotiate, and pass and/or vote for legislation that supports the common good of all Americans…

WHAT IS A POLICY ISSUE YOU ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT AND WHY?

The weakness of politicians to protect the rights of the majority of law-abiding citizens whilst pandering to fringe minorities.

HOW DO YOU THINK WE CAN UNITE OUR COUNTRY AND FIX POLITICS?

Election reform - I attribute American resilience and adaptive nature to our inventive, entrepreneurial culture. We need a logical immigration policy and first-rate system of higher education. What’s holding us back, however, is a hopelessly dysfunctional political system that has lost the capacity to deal effectively with big national problems.
Our present arrangements ignores political reforms necessary that must be both powerful and attainable.
We could, for example, launch a frontal attack on Washington’s transactional culture and diminish the power of special interests by changing the way we finance Congressional elections. And rather than accept the inevitability of “rotten boroughs,” we could counter the worst abuses of gerrymandering by insisting that political districts be drawn by nonpartisan commissions charged with increasing rather than decreasing the number of competitive seats. We could also think seriously about addressing the abuse of the filibuster in the Senate, something that has sparked a great deal of commentary from progressives of late.
Fixing our broken political system is a cause that has the potential to unite all more politicians than not. 
Our political system is broken and our country is in trouble! The two political parties are so polarized that Washington is paralyzed. Our elected officials continue a vicious cycle of mindless partisanship, inaction on crucial issues and unsustainable dysfunction covered endlessly in the 24-hour news cycle.
I suggest we truly look at the issues that concern us, as Americans, most and vote for the man/woman that most represents our own views regardless of party.
We need to get the work of the American people done!